Contents of the volume

2020, Volume 73 - Issue 4

ISSN: 2499-8265
RSS feed citation: At RePEc
Publication date: 19 November 2020

THE PUBLISHER'S ADDRESS

Luigi Attanasio

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THE PROSPECTS FOR INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC RELATIONS FOLLOWING THE COVID19 EMERGENCY

Elena Seghezza

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UNITED STATES-CHINA TRADE WAR AND THE EMERGENCE OF GLOBAL COVID-19 PANDEMIC

Oluwole Owoye, Olugbenga A. ONAFOWORA

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WHEN THE CONTAGION EFFECT WENT LIVE: THE FIRST RESPONSES TO THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

Lorenzo Esposito, Giuseppe Mastromatteo

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COVID-19: A PERSPECTIVE FOR THE ITALIAN HEALTH SERVICE

Giuseppe Profiti

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THE IDES OF MARCH. DID ITALIAN COVID-19 CRISIS FUEL US ECONOMIC POLICY UNCERTAINTY?

Georgios Garafas, Dimitrios DIMITRIOU

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THE IMPACT OF CORONAVIRUS AND THE POLICIES NEEDED

Nicola Acocella

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Genoa Chamber of Commerce
Economia Internazionale / International Economics

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Corresponding author

Oluwole OWOYE, Department of Social Sciences, Western Connecticut State University, Danbury, Connecticut, USA

Co-authors

Olugbenga A. ONAFOWORA, Department of Economics, Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania, USA

United States-China Trade War and the Emergence of Global COVID-19 Pandemic

Pages

435-466

Abstract

This paper asserts that the retaliatory trade wars between the United States and China contributed to the emergence of the global COVID-19 pandemic because the trade wars hindered the collaboration, coordination, and transparent information sharing about infectious diseases that could have adverse effects on the global economy. The retaliatory trade wars between the two largest economies in the world turned the symmetric information sharing about global infectious diseases to asymmetric information sharing, thus the inability to prepare for the emergence of the current global COVID-19 pandemic shock. In the first two decades of the 21st century, the World Health Organization (WHO) in collaboration, coordination, and transparent information sharing with global health care systems managed to curtail the outbreaks of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2002-2003, H1N1 in 2009, Ebola in 2014, Zika in 2015, Dengue in 2016, and other deadly infectious diseases. We maintain that the symmetric information sharing enabled the WHO and the other global health care systems to build the firewall against these deadly infectious diseases. The absence of collaboration, coordination, and the symmetric information sharing due to the trade wars forced both countries to resort to information distortions; therefore, the inability to prepare for the global COVID-19 pandemic. Using conceptual economics, we show that the confluence of the retaliatory trade wars and COVID-19 pandemic has significant negative ramifications on economies worldwide.  

JEL classification

F13, F51, F53, O34, O38, O57

Keywords

Trade Wars, Infectious Diseases, COVID-19, Collaboration, Information Sharing

Index

  1. Introduction
  2. Literature review
  3. The confluence of trade wars and the global COVID-19 pandemic
  4. The impacts on the global economy
  5. Concluding remarks and policy implications

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