Contents of the volume

2017, Volume 70 - Issue 4

ISSN: 2499-8265
RSS feed citation: At RePEc
Publication date: 20 October 2017

SECULAR STAGNATION: IS IT IN THE DATA?

Dimitris Kirikos

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INCOME INEQUALITY AND GROWTH: NEW INSIGHTS FROM ITALY

Bernard Njindan Iyke, Sin-Yu HO

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FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENTS, EXPORTS, UNEMPLOYMENT AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN THE NEW EU MEMBERS – A PANEL DATA APPROACH

Nicholaos Dritsakis, Pavlos Stamatiou

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IS REAL DEPRECIATION OR MORE GOVERNMENT DEBT CONTRACTIONARY? THE CASE OF ROMANIA

Yu Hsing

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HEDGE FUNDS: A POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

Cameron J. Gable, Shalendra Sharma

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REASSESSING THE SUSTAINABILITY OF PUBLIC FINANCES IN POLAND: EVIDENCE FROM A MULTICOINTEGRATION APPROACH

Marco Tronzano

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THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN INCOME INEQUALITY AND HEALTH IN ADVANCED COUNTRIES

Stephen Foreman

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Genoa Chamber of Commerce
Economia Internazionale / International Economics

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Corresponding author

Yu HSING, Department of Management & Business Administration, College of Business, Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, LA, USA

Is Real Depreciation or more Government Debt Contractionary? The Case of Romania

Pages

469-478

Abstract

Applying the aggregate demand and aggregate supply model, this paper finds that Romania’s real GDP is positively associated with real appreciation of the leu during 2005.Q2 – 2013.Q4, the real oil price and real wages and negatively influenced by real appreciation of the leu during 2014.Q1 – 2016.Q3, government debt as a percent of GDP, the real interest rate and the expected inflation rate. These results suggest that recent real depreciation of the leu would help raise real GDP, whereas recent rising government debt as a percent of GDP would be harmful to real GDP.

JEL classification

F31, E62

Keywords

Exchange Rates, Government Debt, Interest Rates, Oil Prices, Wages

Index

  1. Introduction
  2. The model
  3. Empirical results
  4. Summary and conclusions

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